"What really motivates elementary particle physicists is a sense of how the world is ordered—it is, they believe, a world governed by simple universal principles that we are capable of discovering. But not everyone feels the importance of this. During the debate over the SSC, I was on the Larry King radio show with a congressman who opposed it. He said that he wasn’t against spending on science, but that we had to set priorities. I explained that the SSC was going to help us learn the laws of nature, and I asked if that didn’t deserve a high priority. I remember every word of his answer. It was “No.”"

— Steven Weinberg on The Crisis of Big Science | The New York Review of Books (via thisistheverge)

(via thisistheverge)

cnnmoneytech:

Just wanted to give a belated shout out to XCom Global for saving me the headache of scrambling for a connection at this year’s Mobile World Congress.

At an event with 70,000 attendees, you could imagine that connectivity is an issue — ironic, at a conference about connectivity. Wi-Fi is…

minimalmac:

I’m have to admit being a bit baffled by how nobody else seems to have done what Apple did with the Macbook Air – even several years after the first release, the other notebook vendors continue to push those ugly and *clunky* things. Yes, there are vendors that have tried to emulate it, but usually pretty badly. I don’t think I’m unusual in preferring my laptop to be thin and light.

Really fascinating interview with the father of Linux. He discusses all manner of things including his project management style, the future of “disposable” computers, and how he works from home and gets things done. But, he spends the first couple of questions talking about his love of the MacBook Air and his general disdain for just about every other laptop being made (i.e. Specifically, anything that is not the MacBook Air).

chipotle:

CNET’s Steven Musil:

Leviathan Security Group researcher Paul Brodeur explained in a blog post earlier this week that he created a proof-of-concept to demonstrate that “no permissions” apps still have access to the device’s SD card, handset identification data, and files stored by other apps.

This is not a “this could only happen on Android!” sort of problem, of course. I’m more interested in seeing how various people spin this, though: whenever there’s a flaw in iOS, it’s a sign that Apple’s “closed and draconian” approach doesn’t work, and whenever there’s a flaw in Android, it’s a sign that Google’s “open and fragmented” approach doesn’t work. Maybe both approaches actually work pretty well—but not flawlessly.

These sorts of problems are potentially bigger on Android simply because the “gatekeeper” approach Apple takes with iThing apps is an extra line of defense against applications actually doing bad things with exploits. Of course, this doesn’t mean applications can’t do bad—or at least very unwise—things without exploits, as Path helpfully demonstrated not too long ago.

hautepop:

“For all of the flaws of 20th century critical theory - its obtuseness, its abandonment of the ordinary reader - it also made it impossible to look at words as transparent conduits of meaning. Instead, we had no choice but to see the webs of power and ideas that they wove and we wove with them. [Google’s] Project Glass [concept video for AR glasses] and its tantalizingly close promise of augmented reality, demands we do the same for the world of digital technology: to acknowledge that we cannot simply put on and take off glasses that color our world; instead, we can only exchange one ambivalent, culturally loaded pair for another.”
Google Glasses and the Myth of Augmented Reality, The Atlantic

hautepop:

“For all of the flaws of 20th century critical theory - its obtuseness, its abandonment of the ordinary reader - it also made it impossible to look at words as transparent conduits of meaning. Instead, we had no choice but to see the webs of power and ideas that they wove and we wove with them. [Google’s] Project Glass [concept video for AR glasses] and its tantalizingly close promise of augmented reality, demands we do the same for the world of digital technology: to acknowledge that we cannot simply put on and take off glasses that color our world; instead, we can only exchange one ambivalent, culturally loaded pair for another.”

Google Glasses and the Myth of Augmented Reality, The Atlantic

prostheticknowledge:

What happens when a tree branch falls onto a powerline? - Fanfiction Edition

OK, this is weird …

10 months ago, I posted this short video (I didn’t record it, but discovered it and uploaded as it wasn’t embeddable). It is by far the most popular thing I have ever shared, and every so often, my dashboard reignites (sorry) with activity about it. Now, I discover that, popular as it is, it has it’s own fan-fiction …

EDIT: OK, I admit, I did have to wipe away a tear …

nefnef:

jamie-lynn-starship-ranger:

ravenmgee:

sherlocked-inside-the-tardis:

shurlawk:

scarfu:

noviceartist:

laurenocuma:

brivonnet:

What happens when a tree branch falls onto a powerline?

Answer: Dramatic Annihilation

Only 17 seconds long - stick to the end.

Submitted by:  nonniebyrd

THAT IS BEAUTIFUL.

Did that shit…just explode rainbows?!

iahenkjiakhbfkjwe

idk why but I burst out laughing every time I see this video

gapes at screen with open mouth

“No,” the wire whispered. “You can’t—you’ll burn—”

The branch smiled sadly, looking up at the tree that had protected her for so many years. But, the branch needed to know for herself the heat and passion of the wires. “I would rather burn a hundred times over,” she said softly, “than live an eternity away from you.”

“But, I’m right here! You can see me every day!” The wire pleaded desperately. “You don’t have to do this!”

“Actually, I do,” the branch replied. “I’m falling and it’s only a matter of time. Pleasetell me you’ll catch me. Even if I’ll burn, tell me you’ll catch me.”

The wire was silent before swaying in affirmation, gazing up at the branch that had always been so far above him. Always out of reach, always kept away, protected jealously by the tree.

The wind was picking up, and with each blow, the branch swung ever closer to the wires until finally, she was ripped from the tree and fell down into the waiting arms of her beloved.

“Hello,” she whispered, feeling that dreadful heat creeping up from her base. It wouldn’t be long now. The sparks were already starting and she was starting to glow. The wire tried to prevent the inevitable, desperately trying to contain the power he knew would lead to her violent destruction, but all he could do was watch her burn as they swayed in the wind.

It was over within a few seconds. There was a sudden burst of colorful flames and everything was still. Even the wind had died down, leaving the remnants of the branchhis branchsprawled across him, nothing more than a charred memory.

You know Shweta’s going to great lengths not to do her paper when she writes a tragic OTP for a telephone wire and a tree branch.

I’m going to now creep out as discreetly as possible and try to write my paper. Or something.

Tumblrdid you just give me a fanfictionabout a stick falling on a power line?

And people wonder why I spend so much time with you.

Still a better love story than Twilight.

BEST FANFICTION YET

(Source: wimp.com)

newsme:

I’ll think we’ve all been there: you get into a subway car, and just as the doors are closing, you realize that you’ve forgotten to take your phone out, pull to refresh, and wait 10 seconds to download the latest news articles to read offline. You curse under your breath and switch back to Angry…

Look To The Sky!

parislemon:

Can’t imagine why both Dropbox and Microsoft’s SkyDrive have big updates today. You’d think the entry something else into their airspace was imminent…

"“In the world of collaborative consumption, people are investing in meaning.” - Rachel Botsman"

How Technology is Taking us Back to Old Market Values (via thenextweb)

(via thenextweb)

8bitfuture:

‘Personal Satellite’ goes on sale.
The TubeSat is a low-cost satellite, which can be custom built by individuals to perform any (legal) purpose. The cost of just over US$8,000 includes the basic satellite kit and launch into orbit.
To avoid creating even more space junk, TubeSats are put into a self-decaying orbit 310 kilometres above the Earth, where they operate for several weeks (dependent on solar activity), before burning up in Earth’s atmosphere.

TubeSats are designed to function as a Basic Satellite Bus or as a simple stand-alone satellite. Each TubeSat kit includes the satellite’s structural components, printed circuit board (PCB) Gerber Files, electronic components, solar cells, batteries,  transceiver (requires an authorized frequency allocation from the FCC or equivalent non-US entity), antennas, microcomputer, and the required programming tools. With these components, the builder can construct a satellite that can be received on the ground by a hand-held amateur radio receiver. Simple applications include broadcasting a repeating message from orbit or programming the satellite to function as an orbital amateur radio relay station.

TubeSat’s will be taken to orbit by NEPTUNE Modular Series launch vehicles, developed by Interorbital Systems.
Check out the order page here.

8bitfuture:

‘Personal Satellite’ goes on sale.

The TubeSat is a low-cost satellite, which can be custom built by individuals to perform any (legal) purpose. The cost of just over US$8,000 includes the basic satellite kit and launch into orbit.

To avoid creating even more space junk, TubeSats are put into a self-decaying orbit 310 kilometres above the Earth, where they operate for several weeks (dependent on solar activity), before burning up in Earth’s atmosphere.

TubeSats are designed to function as a Basic Satellite Bus or as a simple stand-alone satellite. Each TubeSat kit includes the satellite’s structural components, printed circuit board (PCB) Gerber Files, electronic components, solar cells, batteries,  transceiver (requires an authorized frequency allocation from the FCC or equivalent non-US entity), antennas, microcomputer, and the required programming tools. With these components, the builder can construct a satellite that can be received on the ground by a hand-held amateur radio receiver. Simple applications include broadcasting a repeating message from orbit or programming the satellite to function as an orbital amateur radio relay station.

TubeSat’s will be taken to orbit by NEPTUNE Modular Series launch vehicles, developed by Interorbital Systems.

Check out the order page here.

(via 8bitfuture)